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  1. avatar says

    The videos I use a lot to study but library or coffee shops always having dubious wifi, any reason why you won’t allow the videos to be downloaded as would be very helpful?

  2. Profile photo of iluvgorgeous says

    hi the exam format for f8 is changing in December 2014. I failed this last time and wanted to know if i can do it in december instead of June? what would be the impact? Please reply before the 8th as i need to apply for the exam.

  3. avatar says

    Im british and live in london and doing acca exams in my spare time. Passed first four and will sit F8 in june, should I sit F8 UK or F8 INT. What are differences and is the videos on opentuition UK or INT?
    Thanks

  4. avatar says

    I have a question , like as we see the Past Papers of f8 , it says describe any THREE procedures or identify and explain any Six factors . but when we look at the answer it almost states more then 10 or 8 procedures or factors . like in the December 2013 of Q.1 (b) he asked to describe and explain SIX audit risks and auditor;s response , but in the answer he gives more than 14 audit risks and auditor’s response ? isnt it lengthy and MORE than the required answer ? why dont we just straight away write SIX risks ? and even in the december 2013 Q.2 (b) examiner asked for THREE factors , but in answer its FIVE written . in part (c) of same question he asked for THREE procedures but they have written 7 in answer ! my question is what if I write just as he asked … not more than or not less than it , ???? isit OK then ? kindly plz answer me as soon as possible , Thank you …..!

    • Profile photo of mario123 says

      They cover all possible points in the solution but obviously it’s common sense that when attempting the exam we just go for the number of points that are required of us by the question.
      The catch is to not leave behind any point from the student’s perspective. For example if I attempt a past paper question and some or all of my points do not match the one’s given at the back (of the kit I’m assuming) then I can easily get panicked and begin to question my knowledge. If all possible points are given we can just cross out the rest and confirm that the one’s we came up with are correct. The one’s you cross out/ ignore can be glanced to broaden your mind or learn the concept given from a different perspective.
      I’m hoping that answers it. Read technical articles and exam tips for more tricks of the trade. All the best!

  5. avatar says

    done a few days study now of f8. the syllabus seems very small compared to f4 law. notes 80 pages compared to 130 and just ten hour of videos compared to over 20 for law. Nothing seems difficult or confusing just simple explanations to what an auditor does. Law was challening but this f8 pass rate is low what aam i missing?

    • avatar says

      Hi, in my view, the law is very technical sometimes appears to lack logic. Auditing is a lot of common sense. If a non-auditor were asked “How would you confirm that a particular asset were the property of a specific company, that it was worth however much the company claimed and that the asset actually existed?” then having been led down the appropriate path once, that non-auditor would pretty quickly pick up the idea.

      I agree with you Paul, the F8 is not as demanding as the law paper.

      However, you underestimate it at your peril.

      My tutor kept repeating the point that you need to write, and write and write. He said that the main cause of failure in his opinion was an inability of students to write enough points

  6. avatar says

    Dear Open tuition

    I have done F1-F4. For June 2014 I am thinking of sitting two more papers F5 and F8. I read ideally you should do them in order but is doing F8 before F6 and F7 an issue at all?

    • avatar says

      I did auditing before tax and accounting – I think it depends on your work experience. If you can blah blah, then F8 should be ok and if you strugle with the numbers maybe better to leave f6 and F7 until after F8.

      But when I did do tax and accounts, I found them to be ok – passed both first time. The real key to this acca trip is practice and then more practice

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